To Schedule an Appointment
Call (732) 446 9900

From the Doctor's Desk

From the Doctor's Desk

rss

A Central Jersey Neurological Center Blog


Balance Exercises

From the Doctor's Desk

How to Improve Your Balance


Each year, U.S. hospitals have 300,000 admissions for broken hips, mostly due to falls. Balance exercises can help you avoid the falls that may result in loss of independence. Stretch and strengthening are essential for maintaining balance.

About Strength and Balance Exercises

Balance exercises include plantar flexion, hip flexion, hip extension, knee flexion, and side leg raise. Also do the knee-extension exercise, which helps you keep your balance by increasing muscle strength in your upper thighs.

Some Words of Caution

  • Do not overdo it! Build up gradually. Start with 10 minutes per day and slowly build up to about 20 minutes per day.
  • Take a day off:  it is best to work about 5 to 6 days per week. 
  • Always consult with your doctor first.  Never do more than you feel comfortable with.
  • Note that these exercises instruct you to hold onto a table or chair for balance. Hold onto the table with only one hand. As you progress, try holding on with only one fingertip. Next, try these exercises without holding on at all. If you are very steady on your feet, move on to doing the exercises using no hands, with your eyes closed. Have someone stand close by if you are unsteady.

 Plantar Flexion


1.    Stand straight; hold onto a table or chair for balance.
2.    Slowly stand on tip toe, as high as possible.
3.    Hold position for 1 second.
4.    Slowly lower heels all the way back down. Pause.
5.    Repeat 8 to 15 times.
6.    Rest; then do another set of 8 to 15 repetitions.
7.    Add these modifications as you progress:  Hold table with one hand, then one fingertip, then no hands; then do exercise with eyes closed, if steady.
 
Knee Flexion

 

1.    Stand straight; hold onto a table or chair for balance.
2.    Slowly bend knee as far as possible, so foot lifts up behind you.
3.    Hold position for 1 second.
4.    Slowly lower foot all the way back down. Pause.
5.    Repeat with other leg.
6.    Alternate legs until you have done 8 to 15 repetitions with each leg.
7.    Rest; then do another set of 8 to 15 alternating repetitions.
8.    Add these modifications as you progress:  add these modifications as you progress: Hold table with one hand, then one fingertip, then no hands; then do exercise with eyes closed, if steady.
 

Hip Flexion

 

1.    Stand straight; hold onto a table or chair for balance.
2.    Slowly bend one knee toward chest, without bending waist or hips.
3.    Hold position for 1 second.
4.    Slowly lower leg all the way down. Pause.
5.    Repeat with other leg.
6.    Alternate legs until you have done 8 to 15 repetitions with each leg.
7.    Rest; then do another set of 8 to 15 alternating repetitions.
8.    Add these modifications as you progress: Hold table with one hand, then one fingertip, then no hands; then do exercise with eyes closed, if steady.
 
 
Hip Extension
Do hip extension as part of your regularly scheduled strength exercises, and add these modifications as you progress: Hold table with one hand, then one fingertip, then no hands; then do exercise with eyes closed, if steady.
1.    Stand 12 to 18 inches from a table or chair, feet slightly apart.
2.    Bend forward at hips at about 45-degree angle; hold onto a table or chair for balance.
3.    Slowly lift one leg straight backwards without bending your knee, pointing your toes, or bending your upper body any farther forward.
4.    Hold position for 1 second.
5.    Slowly lower leg. Pause.
6.    Repeat with other leg.
7.    Alternate legs until you have done 8 to 15 repetitions with each leg.
8.    Rest; then do another set of 8 to 15 alternating repetitions.
9.    Add modifications as you progress.
 
Side Leg Raise
 
1.    Stand straight, directly behind table or chair, feet slightly apart.
2.    Hold onto table or chair for balance.
3.    Slowly lift one leg to side 6-12 inches out to side. Keep your back and both legs straight. Don't point your toes outward; keep them facing forward.
4.    Hold position for 1 second.
5.    Slowly lower leg all the way down. Pause.
6.    Repeat with other leg.
7.    Alternate legs unti you have done 8 to 15 repetitions with each leg.
8.    Rest; then do another set of 8 to 15 alternating repetitions.
9.    Add these modifications as you progress: Hold table with one hand, then one fingertip, then no hands; then do exercise with eyes closed, if steady.
 

Anytime/Anywhere

 

These types of exercises also improve your balance. You can do them almost anytime, anywhere, and as often as you like, as long as you have something sturdy nearby to hold onto if you become unsteady.
Examples:
•    Walk heel-to-toe. Position your heel just in front of the toes of the opposite foot each time you take a step. Your heel and toes should touch or almost touch. (See Illustration.)
•    Stand on one foot (for example, while waiting in line at the grocery store or at the bus stop). Alternate feet.
•    Stand up and sit down without using your hands.

Try them and leave feedback!





Comments are closed.
Showing 0 Comment